Category Archives: OOP

An Imagined History of Object-Oriented Programming

Having looked at hopefully modern views on Object-Oriented analysis and design, it’s time to look at what happened to Object-Oriented Programming. This is an opinionated, ideologically-motivated history, that in no way reflects reality: a real history of OOP would require … Continue reading

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Some programming languages have a final keyword, making types closed for extension and open for modification.

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Runtime verification in Erlang by using contracts

About this paper Runtime verification in Erlang by using contracts, L.-A. Fredlund et al, presented at WFLP 2018. Notes Spoiler alert, but the conclusion to my book OOP the Easy Way is that we should have independently-running objects, like we … Continue reading

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Mach and Matchmaker: kernel and language support for object-oriented distributed systems

About this paper Mach and Matchmaker: kernel and language support for object-oriented distributed systems , Michael B. Jones and Richard F. Rashid, from the proceedings of OOPSLA ’86. Notes Yes, 1986 was a long time ago, but the topics of … Continue reading

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Research Watch, and Java by Contract

I introduced Java by Contract, a tool for building design-by-contract style invariants, preconditions and postconditions in Java using annotations. It’s MIT licensed, contributions are welcome, and I hope this helps lots of people to introduce stronger correctness checking into your … Continue reading

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Cleaner Code

Readers of OOP the easy way will be familiar with the distinction between object-oriented programming and procedural programming. You will have read, in that book, about how what we claim is OOP in the sentence “OOP has failed” is actually … Continue reading

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Two books

A member of a mailing list I’m on recently asked: what two books should be on every engineer’s bookshelf? Here’s my answer. Many software engineers, the ones described toward the end of Code Complete 2, would benefit most from Donald … Continue reading

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Concurrent objects and SCOOP

Representing concurrency in an object-oriented system has been a long-standing problem. Encapsulating the concurrency primitives via objects and methods is easy enough, but doesn’t get us anywhere. We still end up composing our programs out of threads and mutexes and … Continue reading

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Microservices for the Desktop

In OOP the Easy Way, I make the argument that microservices are a rare instance of OOP done well: Microservice adopters are able to implement different services in different technologies, to think about changes to a given service only in … Continue reading

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OOP the Easy Way: now 100% complete

Hello readers, part 3, the final part of the “OOP the Easy Way” journey, has now been published at Leanpub! Thanks for joining me along the way! As ever, corrections, questions, and comments are welcome (you can comment here if … Continue reading

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