My changing relationship with books

My Delicious Library collection just hit 1,000 books. That’s not so big, it’s only a fraction of the books I’ve read in my life. I only started cataloguing my books a few years ago.

What is alarming about that is that most of the books are in my house, and most are in physical form. I read a lot, and the majority of the time I’m reading something I own. The reason it’s worrying is that these books take up a lot of space, and cost a lot of money.

I’ve had an on-again, off-again relationship with ebooks. Of course they take up less space, and are more convenient when travelling. The problems with DRM and ownership mean that I tend to only use ebooks now for books from Project Gutenberg or the internet archive, and PDFs of scholarly papers.

And not even that second one, due to the lack of big enough readers. For a long time I owned and enjoyed a Kindle DX, with a screen big enough that a typical magazine page was legible without zooming in. Zooming in on a columnar page is horrific. It’s like watching a tennis match through a keyhole. But the Kindle DX broke, is no longer a thing, and has no competitors. I don’t enjoy reading on regular computer screens, so the option of using a multipurpose tablet is not a good one.

Ebooks also suffer from being out of sight and out of mind. I actually bought some bundle of UX/HCI/design books over a year ago, and have never read them. When I want to read, I look at my pile of unread books and my shelves. I don’t look in ~/Documents/ebooks.

I do listen to audiobooks when I commute, but only when I commute. It’d be nice to have some kind of multimodal reader, across a “printed” and “spoken” format. The Kindle text-to-speech was not that, when I tried it. Jeremy Northam does a much better job of reading out The Road to Wigan Pier than an automated speech synthesiser does.

The technique I’m trying at the moment involves heavy use of the library. I’m a member of both the local municipal library and a big university library. I subscribe to a literary review magazine, the London Review of Books. When an article in there intrigues me, I add the book to the reading list in the library app. When I get to it, I request the book.

That’s not necessarily earth-shattering news. Both public and subscription libraries have existed for centuries. What’s interesting is that for this dedicated reader and technology professional, the digital revolution has yet to usurp the library and its collection of bound books.

What’s on the other channel?

I run a company, a mission-driven software consultancy that aims to make it easier and faster to make high-quality software that preserves privacy and freedom. On the homepage you’ll find Research Watch, where I talk about research papers I read. For example, the most recent article is Runtime verification in Erlang by using contracts, which was presented at a conference last year. Articles from the last few decades are discussed: most is from the last couple of years, nothing yet is older than I am.

At de Programmatica Ipsum, I write on “individuals, interactions, and the true valuation of the things on the left” with Adrian Kosmaczewski and a glorious feast of guest writers. The most recent issue was on work, the upcoming issue is on programming history. You can subscribe or buy our back-catalogue to read all the issues.

Anyway, those are other places where you might want to read my writing. If people are interested I could publish their feeds here, but you may as well just check each out yourself :).

Ultimate Programmer Super Stack Reloaded

Remember remember the cough 6th of November, when APPropriate Behaviour joined a wealth of other learning material for software engineers in a super-discounted bundle called the Ultimate Programmer Super Stack?

It’s happening again! This is a five-day flash sale, with all same material on levelling up as a programmer, running a startup, and learning new technologies like Aurelia, Node, Python and more. The link at the top of this paragraph goes to the sales page, and you’ve got until Monday, when it’s gone for good.

Two books

A member of a mailing list I’m on recently asked: what two books should be on every engineer’s bookshelf? Here’s my answer.

Many software engineers, the ones described toward the end of Code Complete 2, would benefit most from Donald Knuth’s The Art of Computer Programming and Computers and Typesetting. It is truly astounding that one man has contributed so comprehensively to the art of variable-height monitor configurations.

If, to misquote Bill Hicks, “you’ve got yourself a reader”, then my picks are coloured by the fact that I’ve been trying to rehabilitate Object-Oriented Design for the last few years, by re-introducing a couple of concepts that got put aside over the recent decades:

  1. Object orientation; and
  2. Design.

With that in mind, my two recommendations are the early material from that field that I think shows the biggest divergence in thinking. Readers should be asking themselves “are these two authors really writing about the same topic?”, “where is the user of the software system in this book?”, “who are the users of the software system in this book?”, and “do I really need to choose one or other of these models, why not both or bits of both?”

  1. “Object-Oriented Programming: an evolutionary approach” by Brad Cox (there is another edition with Andrew Novobilski as a co-author). Cox’s model is the npm/CPAN model: programmers make objects (“software ICs”), describe their characteristics in a data sheet, and publish them in a catalogue. Integrators choose likely-looking objects from the catalogue and assemble an application out of them.

  2. “Object-Oriented Software Construction” by Bertrand Meyer. Meyer’s model is the “software engineering” model: work out what the system should do, partition that into “classes” based on where the data should naturally live, and design and build those classes. In designing the classes, pay particular attention to the expectations governing how they communicate: the ma as Alan Kay called the gaps between the objects.

Ultimate Programmer Super Stack: Last day!

I already wrote about the Ultimate Programmer Super Stack, a huge bundle of books and courses on a range of technologies: Python, JS, Ruby, Java, HTML, node, Aurelia… and APPropriate Behaviour, my book on everything that goes into being a programmer that isn’t programming.

Today is the last day of the bundle. Check it out here, it won’t be available for long.

Ultimate Programmer Super Stack

There’s a great bundle of polyglot learning taking place over at the Ultimate Programmer Super Stack. My book, APPropriate Behaviour – the things every programmer needs to know that aren’t programming – is featured alongside content on Python, Ruby, Java, JS, Aurelia, Node, startups, and more.

The bundle is just up for a week, but please do check it out: for not much more than you’d probably pay for APPropriate Behaviour you’ll get a whole heap of stuff that should keep you entertained for a while :).

OOP the Easy Way: now 100% complete

Hello readers, part 3, the final part of the “OOP the Easy Way” journey, has now been published at Leanpub! Thanks for joining me along the way! As ever, corrections, questions, and comments are welcome (you can comment here if you like), and as ever, readers who buy the book now will receive free updates for the lifetime of the book. While there’s nothing new to add, this means that corrections and expansions will be free to all readers.

If you enjoy OOP the Easy Way or found it informative (or maybe even both), please recommend it to your friends, colleagues and followers. It’d be great if they could enjoy it, be informed by it, or both, too!

On Sharecropping

Today I came across the site Danny Reviews, at which fellow internet Danny Yu has posted over 1400 book reviews. I realised that if I had posted book reviews of every book I have read since I became an internet, I would have more than 900 reviews online, maybe over 1000. How do I know? Because my GoodReads profile lists those 900 books.

Now actually GoodReads are quite generous in their terms: I own all of the information I’ve posted there, and I can export all my books, including my reviews such as they are. But that’s entirely up to GoodReads, they decided to be nice and provide an export feature. Other sites take their digital sharecropping more seriously.

I got lucky, but we should all think carefully about what we’re posting to where.