Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programmers

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Tuesday, November 26, 2019

Everyone rejecting everyone else

It’s common in our cooler-than-Agile, post-Agile community to say that Agile teams who “didn’t get it” eschewed good existing practices in their rush to adopt new ways of thinking. We don’t need UML, we’re Agile! Working software over comprehensive documentation!

This short post is a reminder that it ran both ways, and that people used to the earlier ways of thinking also eschewed integrating their tools into the Agile methodology. We don’t need Agile, we’re Model-Driven! Here’s an excerpt from 2004’s UML 2 Toolkit:

Certain object-oriented methods on the market today, such as The Unified Process, might be considered processes. However, other lightweight methods, such as Extreme Programming (XP), are not robust enough to be considered oricesses in the way we use the term here. Although they provide a valuable set of interrelated techniques, they are often referred to as “small m methodologies” rather than as software-engineering processes.

This is in the context of saying that UML supports software-engineering processes in which a sequence of activities produce “documentation…about the system being built” and “a product that solves the initial problems is introduced and delivered”. So XP is not robust enough at doing those things for UML advocates to advocate UML in the context of XP.

So it’s not just that Agilistas abandoned existing practices, but there’s an extent to which existing practitioners abandoned Agilistas too.

posted by Graham at 10:15  

1 Comment »

  1. I learned about agility from Scott W.Ambler’s book ‘The Object Primer’, which mashed up OOP, Agile and UML in his ‘Agile Modelling’… Thing. I learned not to call it a “method” or a “process” from the burns I received in The Flame Wars.

    Comment by Andy Wootton — 2020-01-07 @ 16:23

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