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An update on the HURD project

Last time, on Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programmers, I was building an object-oriented programming system on top of the HURD, and had realised that I needed to use its trivfs library for a sender to be able to discover an object to send messages to.

I got it working very quickly, but ended up shaving a yak due to my poor understanding of the HURD translator lifecycle which meant that I didn’t think I had got it working.

My goal was to build a translator that works like the Objective-C nil object: it accepts any message and responds by returning itself. Given that I’m building on the Mach ports abstraction, “itself” is defined as a port over which you can send messages to the same object.

If I returned an integer from the message, everything worked on both sides. However, just because a port name is an integer doesn’t mean that sending it as an int will work, just as opening a file in one process then sending the file descriptor as a number to another process wouldn’t let the receiving process access the file. I tried sending it as a mach_port_t, but got a lifecycle error: the client was told that the server had died.

On doing some reading, I discovered that the port had to be sent as a mach_port_send_t for send rights to be transferred to the client. Making that change, the message now fails with a type error.

An aside, here, on getting help with this problem. There is good documentation: the HURD source is easy to read and with helpful comments, they have good documentation including examples, the OSF documentation is very helpful, there are books from “back in the day” and videos with useful insights.

On the other hand, “help” is hard to come by. I eventually answered my own stack overflow question on the topic, having not received a reply on there, the HURD mailing list or their IRC channel. The videos described above come from FOSDEM and I’m heading out there next week, I’ll try to make some contacts in person and join their community that way.

OK, so back to the main issue, I now have a fix for my problem. Well, sort of, because now that I’m correctly sending a port with a send right I’m back to getting the lifecycle error.

My current plan is not to “fix” that, but to take it as a hint that I’m doing it wrong, and to design my system differently. Using the filesystem as a namespace to look up objects is good, but using the thing I receive as the object to message is a separate responsibility. I’m changing my approach so that the filesystem contains constructors, and they return not their own port but a port to something else that represents the instance they created.

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