Fun and games (with rewritten rules) in Objective-C

An object-oriented programming environment is not a set of rules. Programs do not need to be constructed according to the rules supplied by the environment. An object-oriented environment includes tools for constructing new rules, and programs can use these to good effect. Let’s build multiple method inheritance for Objective-C, to see a new set of rules.

The goal

Given three classes, A, B, and C:

@interface A : NSObject

-(NSInteger)a;
-(NSInteger)double:(NSInteger)n;

@end

@implementation A

-(NSInteger)a { return [self double:6]; }

@end

@interface B : NSObject

-(NSInteger)b;

@end

@implementation B

-(NSInteger)b { return 30; }

@end

@interface C : NSObject

-c;

@end

@implementation C

-(NSInteger)double:(NSInteger)a
{
  return a*2;
}

-c { return @([self a] + [self b]); }

@end

We want to find the value of a C instance’s c property. That depends on its values of a and b, but that class doesn’t have those methods. We should add them.

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
  @autoreleasepool {
    C *c = [C new];
    [c addSuperclass:[A class]];
    [c addSuperclass:[B class]];
    NSLog(@"The answer is %@", c.c);
  }
}

We want the following output:

2015-02-17 20:23:36.810 Mixins[59019:418112] The answer is 42

Find a method from any superclass

Clearly there’s some chicanery going on here. I’ve changed the rules: methods are no longer simply being looked up in a single class. My instance of C has three superclasses: A, B and NSObject.

@interface NSObject (Mixable)

- (void)addSuperclass:(Class)aSuperclass;

@end

@implementation NSObject (Mixable)

-superclasses
{
  return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, "superclasses");
}

- (void)addSuperclass:(Class)aSuperclass
{
  id superclasses = [self superclasses]?:@[];
  id newSupers = [superclasses arrayByAddingObject:aSuperclass];
  objc_setAssociatedObject(self, "superclasses", newSupers, OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC);
}

- (Class)superclassForSelector:(SEL)aSelector
{
  __block Class potentialSuperclass = Nil;
  [[self superclasses] enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(Class aClass, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
    if ([aClass instancesRespondToSelector:aSelector])
    {
      potentialSuperclass = aClass;
      *stop = YES;
    }
  }];
  return potentialSuperclass;
}

- (NSMethodSignature *)original_methodSignatureForSelector:(SEL)aSelector
{
  NSMethodSignature *signature = [self original_methodSignatureForSelector:aSelector];
  if (signature)
  {
    return signature;
  }
  Class potentialSuperclass = [self superclassForSelector:aSelector];
  return [potentialSuperclass instanceMethodSignatureForSelector:aSelector];
}

- (void)forwardInvocation:(NSInvocation *)anInvocation
{
  SEL aSelector = [anInvocation selector];
  Class potentialSuperclass = [self superclassForSelector:aSelector];
  [anInvocation invokeSuperImplementation:potentialSuperclass];
}

+ (void)load
{
  if (self == [NSObject class])
  {
    method_exchangeImplementations(class_getInstanceMethod(self, @selector(original_methodSignatureForSelector:)),
                                   class_getInstanceMethod(self, @selector(methodSignatureForSelector:)));
  }
}

@end

Now invoke that method.

When you write [super foo], the Objective-C runtime needs to send a message to your object but tell the resolution machinery to look at the superclass for the method implementation, not at the current class. It uses a function objc_msgSendSuper to do this. In this case, I don’t have the superclass: I have a superclass, one of potentially many. So what I need to do is more general than what messaging super does.

Luckily for me, objc_msgSendSuper is already sufficiently general. It receives a pointer to self, just like the usual objc_msgSend, but in addition it receives a pointer to the class to be used as the superclass. By controlling that class pointer, I can tell the system which superclass to use.

A category on NSInvocation calls objc_msgSendSuper with the appropriate arguments to get the correct method from the correct class. But how can it call the function correctly? Objective-C messages could receive any number of arguments of any type, and return a value of any type. Constructing a function call when the parameters are discovered at runtime is the job of libffi, which is used here (not shown: a simple, if boring, map of Objective-C value encodings to libffi type descriptions).

@interface NSInvocation (SuperInvoke)

-(void)invokeSuperImplementation:(Class)superclass;

@end

@implementation NSInvocation (SuperInvoke)

- (BOOL)isVoidReturn
{
  return (strcmp([[self methodSignature] methodReturnType], "v") == 0);
}

-(void)invokeSuperImplementation:(Class)superclass
{
  NSMethodSignature *signature = [self methodSignature];
  if (superclass)
  {
    struct objc_super super_class = { .receiver = [self target],
      .super_class = superclass };
    struct objc_super *superPointer = &super_class;
    ffi_cif callInterface;
    NSUInteger argsCount = [signature numberOfArguments];
    ffi_type **args = malloc(sizeof(ffi_type *) * argsCount);
    for (int i = 0; i < argsCount; i++) {
      args[i] = [self ffiTypeForObjCType:[signature getArgumentTypeAtIndex:i]];
    }
    ffi_type *returnType;
    if ([self isVoidReturn]) {
      returnType = &ffi_type_void;
    }
    else {
      returnType = [self ffiTypeForObjCType:[signature methodReturnType]];
    }
    ffi_status status = ffi_prep_cif(&callInterface,
                                     FFI_DEFAULT_ABI,
                                     (unsigned int)[signature numberOfArguments],
                                     returnType,
                                     args);
    if (status != FFI_OK) {
      NSLog(@"I can't make an FFI frame");
      free(args);
      return;
    }

    void *argsBuffer = malloc([signature frameLength]);
    int cursor = 0;
    cursor += args[0]->size;
    void **values = malloc([signature numberOfArguments] * sizeof(void  *));
    values[0] = &superPointer;

    for (int i = 1; i < [signature numberOfArguments]; i++) {
      values[i] = (argsBuffer + cursor);
      [self getArgument:values[i] atIndex:i];
      cursor += args[i]->size;
    }
    if ([self isVoidReturn]) {
      ffi_call(&callInterface, objc_msgSendSuper, NULL, values);
    } else {
      void *result = malloc(returnType->size);
      ffi_call(&callInterface, objc_msgSendSuper, result, values);
      [self setReturnValue:result];
      free(result);
    }
    free(args);
    free(values);
    free(argsBuffer);
  }
}

@end

Conclusion

You’ve seen this conclusion before: blah blah awesome power of the runtime. It doesn’t just let you do expressive things in the Objective-C game, it lets you define a better game.

Objective-Curry

Sadly it’s not called Schoenfinkeling, but that’s the name of the
person who noticed that there’s no reason to ever have a function with
more than one argument. What you think is a function with two
arguments is actually a function with one argument that returns a
function with one argument, this second function closing over the
first argument and acting perhaps on both.

This is, of course, famed for its application (pardon the pun) to Object-Oriented
Programming. We can take a class like this:

@interface NamePrinter : Curryable

- (void)printFirstName:(NSString *)first surname:(NSString *)last;
- (void)printFirstName:(NSString *)first age:(NSInteger)age;
- (void)printFirstName:(NSString *)first middle:(NSString *)middle surname:(NSString *)last;

@end

and use it like this:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  @autoreleasepool {
    id printer = [[NamePrinter new] autorelease];
    id curried = [printer printFirstName:@"Graham"];
    [curried surname:@"Lee"];
    [curried surname:@"Greene"];
    [curried surname:@"Garden"];
    [curried age:18];

    id alex = [printer printFirstName:@"Alexander"];
    id alexG = [alex middle:@"Graham"];
    [alexG surname:@"Bell"];
  }
}

(your compiler probably complains at this point that it doesn’t know
what you’re up to. Of course, you know better.)

We’ll get results like this:

2015-02-13 00:57:57.421 CurrySauce[41877:134228] Graham Lee
2015-02-13 00:57:57.421 CurrySauce[41877:134228] Graham Greene
2015-02-13 00:57:57.421 CurrySauce[41877:134228] Graham Garden
2015-02-13 00:57:57.422 CurrySauce[41877:134228] Graham is 18 years old
2015-02-13 00:57:57.422 CurrySauce[41877:134228] Alexander Graham Bell

OK, we don’t actually get that for free. There’s some secret sauce I
haven’t shown you: secret curry sauce.

Here be dragons

As with
all the best bits of Objective-C,
you need to turn off the automatic reference counting to do what
follows (you’ll have already seen a call to -autorelease above). ARC
works wonders when you try to write Java in Objective-C, give or take
the strong-weak-strong tango. It isn’t so helpful when you try to
write Objective-C in Objective-C.

Partial application

The NamePrinter class knows that you might call it with a partial
application, so it checks whether the selector you sent in your
message matches the prefix of any method it knows. If it does, and the
return type and argument types in this prefix can be uniquely
determined, then it creates a proxy to listen for the rest of the
application.

The restrictions on types are there due to the way that Objective-C
deals with C types in message sending. It’d be a lot easier to do this
in Ruby or Smalltalk, where everything is an object reference: as
Objective-C needs to deal with C types of different sizes, you must be
able to construct a single invocation from the prefix selector.

int argumentsForSelector(SEL aSelector)
{
  const char *name = sel_getName(aSelector);
  int count = 0;
  while(*name != '\0') {
    if (*name++ == ':') {
      count++;
    }
  }
  return count;
}

@implementation Curryable

- (NSMethodSignature *)methodSignatureForSelector:(SEL)aSelector
{
  NSMethodSignature *superSignature = [super methodSignatureForSelector:aSelector];
  if (superSignature) {
    return superSignature;
  }
  NSString *thisSelectorName = NSStringFromSelector(aSelector);
  NSMutableSet *signatures = [NSMutableSet set];
  int argCount = argumentsForSelector(aSelector);
  Class currentClass = [self class];
  while (currentClass != Nil) {
    unsigned int methodCount = 0;
    Method *methodList = class_copyMethodList(currentClass, &methodCount);
    for (int i = 0; i < methodCount; i++) {
      Method method = methodList[i];
      SEL anotherSelector = method_getName(method);
      NSString *selectorName = NSStringFromSelector(anotherSelector);
      if ([selectorName hasPrefix:thisSelectorName]) {
        NSMethodSignature *fullSignature = [self methodSignatureForSelector:anotherSelector];
        NSMutableString *constructedTypeSignature = [[@"@@:" mutableCopy] autorelease];
        for (int j = 2; j < argCount + 2; j++) {
          [constructedTypeSignature appendString:@([fullSignature getArgumentTypeAtIndex:j])];
        }
        [signatures addObject:[[constructedTypeSignature copy] autorelease]];
      }
    }
    free(methodList);
    currentClass = class_getSuperclass(currentClass);
  }
  if ([signatures count] != 1) {
    NSLog(@"curried selector does not uniquely match the type of any full selector prefix");
    return nil;
  }
  return [NSMethodSignature signatureWithObjCTypes:[[signatures anyObject] UTF8String]];
}

- (void)forwardInvocation:(NSInvocation *)anInvocation
{
  id curry = [CurrySauce curryTarget:self invocation:anInvocation];
  [anInvocation setReturnValue:&curry];
}

@end

All of that, just to return a proxy object.

Finish the application

This proxy also responds to unknown selectors, by trying to tack
them onto the end of the partially-applied selector. If that works,
and it ends up with a selector that the target recognises, then it
constructs the combined invocation, copies the arguments from the two
partial invocations, and invokes it on the target. If the combined
selector is supposed to return something then this proxy unpacks the
return value and puts it into the invocation it received, to ensure
that the caller picks it up.

SEL concatenateSelectors(SEL firstSelector, SEL secondSelector)
{
  NSString *firstPart = NSStringFromSelector(firstSelector);
  NSString *selectorName = [firstPart stringByAppendingString:NSStringFromSelector(secondSelector)];
  return NSSelectorFromString(selectorName);
}

@implementation CurrySauce
{
  id target;
  NSInvocation *invocation;
}

-initWithTarget:object invocation:(NSInvocation *)partialApplication
{
  target = [object retain];
  invocation = [partialApplication retain];
  return self;
}

+curryTarget:object invocation:(NSInvocation *)partialApplication
{
  return [[[self alloc] initWithTarget:object invocation:partialApplication] autorelease];
}

- (NSMethodSignature *)methodSignatureForSelector:(SEL)aSelector
{
  //special case for respondsToSelector
  if (aSelector == @selector(respondsToSelector:)) {
    return [target methodSignatureForSelector:aSelector];
  }
  SEL combinedSelector = concatenateSelectors([invocation selector], aSelector);
  NSMethodSignature *combinedSignature = [target methodSignatureForSelector:combinedSelector];
  if (combinedSignature != nil) {
    NSMutableString *completionType = [NSMutableString stringWithFormat:@"%s@:",[combinedSignature methodReturnType]];
    for (int i = argumentsForSelector([invocation selector]) + 2; i < argumentsForSelector(combinedSelector) + 2; i++) {
      [completionType appendFormat:@"%s",[combinedSignature getArgumentTypeAtIndex:i]];
    }
    return [NSMethodSignature signatureWithObjCTypes:[completionType UTF8String]];
  } else {
    return nil;
  }
}

- (void)forwardInvocation:(NSInvocation *)anInvocation
{
  if ([anInvocation selector] == @selector(respondsToSelector:)) {
    [anInvocation invokeWithTarget:target];
    return;
  }
  SEL realSelector = concatenateSelectors([invocation selector], [anInvocation selector]);
  NSMethodSignature *signature = [target methodSignatureForSelector:realSelector];
  NSInvocation *combined = [NSInvocation invocationWithMethodSignature:signature];
  int argumentToSet = 2;
  void *argBuffer = malloc([[invocation methodSignature] frameLength]);
  for (int i = 2; i < [[invocation methodSignature] numberOfArguments]; i++) {
    [invocation getArgument:argBuffer atIndex:i];
    [combined setArgument:argBuffer atIndex:argumentToSet++];
  }
  free(argBuffer);
  argBuffer = malloc([[anInvocation methodSignature] frameLength]);
  for (int i = 2; i < [[anInvocation methodSignature] numberOfArguments]; i++) {
    [anInvocation getArgument:argBuffer atIndex:i];
    [combined setArgument:argBuffer atIndex:argumentToSet++];
  }
  free(argBuffer);

  [combined setTarget:target];
  [combined setSelector:realSelector];
  [combined invoke];
  if (strcmp([[combined methodSignature] methodReturnType], "v")) {
    void *returnBuffer = malloc([[combined methodSignature] methodReturnLength]);
    [combined getReturnValue:returnBuffer];
    [anInvocation setReturnValue:returnBuffer];
    free(returnBuffer);
  }
}

- (void)dealloc
{
  [target release];
  [invocation release];
  [super dealloc];
}

@end

Conclusion

Blah blah awesome power of the runtime, I suppose. It’s pretty cool
that you can do this sort of thing in 150 lines of ObjC. I doubt many
people would want to use it for reals though.

A subtle [mis]understanding of monads

As I said when talking about Learning Phases, one of the things that happens when I’m trying to learn a new thing is that I build an analogy in terms of something I do understand. This can be dangerous when the analogy is wrong. I’m currently hanging on to the analogy that follows, so I’m publishing it as a straw man argument in the hope that those with more experience than me can critique it and help improve my understanding.

Proposition: Monads are what objects are supposed to look like

Throw away everything you know about Object-Oriented programming, particularly if you know Objective-C, Java, C++ or C#. Now go and read the first edition (the straightforward one, not the detective-novel second edition) of Object-Oriented Software Construction by Bertrand Meyer. You’ll find the principle of Command-Query Separation, that an object’s interface should provide distinct facilities for manipulating and investigating that object. Consider an object as an enclosed module analogous to an electronic circuit[*], with switches you can flip and lights you can observe. Watching a light shouldn’t also have the effect of flipping a switch, and you shouldn’t have to flip a switch in order to watch a light.

How could a language support that principle? Clearly imperative programming is too general, as it lets me mix commands and queries in the same place. What I need is an operation that lets me bind sequential commands together, taking an object in state a and a function that turns state a into state b and creating an object in state b. I also need an operation that lets me run a query, taking an object in state a and returning a value corresponding to a. Given those, and assuming the single responsibility principle has driven me to the point where my object does one thing and can be represented by a single command and query, then the interface on my object is complete.

Interestingly and usefully, except in the (common-ish) special case where my object needs to talk to the world, objects defined in this way are completely understandable mechanistically. The same sequence of commands applied to the same constructor will always yield the same value on query.

But that is, I think, what Monads are supposed to be: things that bind commands into sequences and allow inspection at points in the sequence. As stated in this post’s preamble, I’m not fully confident of this, and may be over-applying an analogy to replace a thing I don’t understand with the comfort of the thing I do. I’d be interested in hearing informed critique on the argument.

Not the other monads

When Alan Kay said that objects are monads, he was talking about Leibniz monads as previously discussed on this blog.

[*] An analogy already present in the proceedings of _that_ 1968 NATO conference, and drawn to extremes by Brad Cox in Object-Oriented Programming: An Evolutionary Approach.

Update

The discussion among my monadically-inclined friends on Facebook indicates that this analogy is incomplete. Yes, monads can be used like that, but they need not be used like that. Counter-examples included the reverse state monad in which state flows backwards, and the TARDIS monad in which state can flow in both directions.

Dark Silicon

About 10 years ago, we decided that the performance gains in single-core processors that come “for free” with advancing semiconductor processes were slowing down. Many chip makers switched to scaling the number of cores on a die, and promoted parallel programming for their products.

Today I learned that the free multicore lunch is over, too. You can no longer turn on all of the transistors in a single chip, so you can no longer get 2× the threads running by doubling the number of cores in your processor.

Like Java, only functional

An idea that clarified itself to me in discussion today is that Swift is to Functional Programming as Java is to Object-Oriented Programming: it is the thing that lets you write C and pretend you’ve adopted some posh-sounding “paradigmatic” non-imperative approach to programming.

I thought this was true shortly before lunch, but now climb partway down from the high horse. Swift is to Functional Programming as Java is to Object-Oriented Programming is still true. However Swift is to C# 3.0 as Java is to Objective-C.

Learning phases

I’ve been trying to learn things this week (specifically Haskell). So
far I’ve been through a lot of different moods, and I thought it’d be
handy to write them down so that next time I’m the teacher I can
remember what it’s like to be on the receiving end. I’m not sure I
(and certainly not anyone else) goes through all of these every
time, nor necessarily in the same order which I can’t remember anyway.

Frustration

These symbols all have no meaning to me, what is even going on here?

Atomic comprehension

If this symbol means that, and this symbol means that, then
combining these two must mean…

Holistic comprehension

OK, so this whole thing does this, which means that these parts must
somehow contribute to doing this. Let’s see…

Argument by analogy

Oh, hold on, what they’re saying is exactly like this other thing from
a different area of my experience. I’ll just pretend it’s the same for
the moment.

Paralysis of choice

I have a problem, and I’ve been given a bunch of tools, and I don’t
know which to apply.

All I have is a hammer

Well, I understood how to apply a lambda function to a collection with
map, so I’m going to contort this problem until it looks like I need
to apply a lambda function to a collection with map.

Progress by context

I have no idea what I’m supposed to do here, but I just read a section
on list comprehension so I bet I’m supposed to use [x | x <- xs]
somehow.

Confusion of dissimilarity

I have no idea how to turn that map into a comprehension or vice
versa, but I was able to produce each at different times on the same
day.

Joy of simplicity

You know what, it’s true when they say that if it type-checks, it
probably works.

Disillusion through broken dreams

Oh, off-by-one errors (and rotation of dimensions) still
type-check. This is bullshit.

Reinventing the wheel

So, I need a thing that applies this thing to all those things,
let me write a function applyFunction :: (a -> b) -> [a] -> [b] that
gives me one of those.

Discovering existing wheels

I have a thing and I need a different thing, let me look in the API
documentation until I find the function that does exactly that.

Rage-quitting

This error makes no sense, screw the entire city of Glasgow.

Rabbit hole tangents

This error makes no sense, but those words look sufficiently rare to
shove into Google. Ooh, three blog posts, a bug report and a PhD
thesis!

Trial and (type) error

This error makes no sense, but it’s telling me line 25 is wrong so
I’ll just rewrite line 25. Again. And again.

Stop! Hammock time

I have no idea how to solve this problem, but it’s
lunchtime. [Om nom nom] Ooh, this problem is trivial.

Minimum Viable Enlightenment

I don’t know what I got wrong, but based on the error message I think
I make this change…yes, that works. I don’t know what I got right.

Law of highfalutin words (I)

I wish someone could explain this to people who didn’t learn the word
“monoid” at school.

Law of highfalutin words (II)

Yes, I can help you with that problem, I just solved it myself. You
see, it becomes easier when you realise that these two things
constitute a monoid.