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A two-dimensional dictionary

What?

A thing I made has just been open-sourced by my employers at Agant: the AGTTwoDimensionalDictionary works a bit like a normal dictionary, except that the keys are CGPoints meaning we can find all the objects within a given rectangle.

Why?

A lot of time on developing Discworld: The Ankh-Morpork Map was spent on performance optimisation: there’s a lot of stuff to get moving around a whole city. As described by Dave Addey, the buildings on the map were traced and rendered into separate images so that we could let characters go behind them. This means that there are a few thousand of those little images, and whenever you’re panning the map around the app has to decide which images are visible, put them in the correct place (in three dimensions; remember people can be in front of or behind the buildings) and draw everything.

A first pass involved creating a set containing all of the objects, looping over them to find out which were within the screen region. This was too slow. Implementing this 2-d index instead made it take about 20% the original time for only a few tens of kilobytes more memory, so that’s where we are now. It’s also why the data type doesn’t currently do any rebalancing of its tree; it had become fast enough for the app it was built in already. This is a key part of performance work: know which battles are worth fighting. About one month of full-time development went into optimising this app, and it would’ve been more if we hadn’t been measuring where the most benefit could be gained. By the time we started releasing betas, every code change was measured in Instruments before being accepted.

Anyway, we’ve open-sourced it so it can be fast enough for your app, too.

How?

There’s a data structure called the multidimensional binary tree or k-d tree, and this dictionary is backed by that data structure. I couldn’t find an implementation of that structure I could use in an iOS app, so cracked open the Objective-C++ and built this one.

Objective-C++? Yes. There are two reasons for using C++ in this context: one is that the structure actually does get accessed often enough in the Discworld app that dynamic dispatch all the way down adds a significant time penalty. The other is that the structure contains enough objects that having a spare isa pointer per node adds a significant memory penalty.

But then there’s also a good reason for using Objective-C: it’s an Objective-C app. My controller objects shouldn’t have to be written in a different language just to use some data structure. Therefore I reach for the only application of ObjC++ that should even be permitted to compile: an implementation in one language that exposes an interface in the other. Even the unit tests are written in straight Objective-C, because that’s how the class is supposed to be used.