Why mock objects aren’t popular this week

The field of software engineering doesn’t change particularly quickly. Tastes in software engineering change all the time: keeping up with them can quickly result in seasickness or even whiplash. For example, at the moment it’s popular to want to do server-side rendering of front end applications, and unpopular to do single-page web apps. Those of us who learned the LAMP stack or WebObjects are back in fashion without having to lift a finger!

Currently it’s fashionable to restate “don’t mock an interface you don’t own” as the more prescriptive, taste-driven statement “mocks are bad”. Rather than change my practice (I use mocks and I’m happy with that from 2014 is still OK), I’ll ask why has this particular taste arisen.

Mock objects let you focus on the ma, the interstices between objects. You can say “when my case controller receives this filter query, it asks the case store for cases satisfying this predicate”. You’re designing a conversation between independent programs, making restrictions about the messages they use to communicate.

But many people don’t think about software that way, and so don’t design software that way either. They think about software as a system that holistically implements a goal. They want to say “when my case controller receives this filter query, it returns a 200 status and the JSON representation of cases matching that query”. Now, the mocks disappear, because you don’t design how the controller talks to the store, you design the outcome of the request which may well include whatever behaviour the store implements.

Of course, tests depending on the specific behaviour of collaborators are more fragile, and the more specific prescription “don’t mock what you don’t control” uses that fragility: if the behaviour of the thing you don’t control changes, you won’t notice because your mock carries on working the way it always did.

That problem is only a problem if you don’t have any other method of auditing your dependencies for fitness for purpose. If you’re relying on some other interface working in a particular way then you should probably also have contract tests, acceptance tests, or some other mechanism to verify that it does indeed work in that way. That would be independent of whether your reliance is captured in tests that use mock objects or some other design.

It’ll only be a short while before mock objects are cool again. Until then, this was an interesting diversion.

About Graham

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1 Response to Why mock objects aren’t popular this week

  1. Pingback: Links 25/06/2022: Pitivi 2022.06 and PeaZip 8.7.0 | Techrights

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