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{ Monthly Archives } July 2020

Music

The problem with musicians these days is they don’t work hard enough to make Daniel Ek, Tim Cook, Sundar Pichai and Jeff Bezos rich.

The closed-open principle

Some programming languages have a final keyword, making types closed for extension and open for modification.

The Nineteen Nineties

I’ve been playing a lot of CD32, and would just like to mention how gloriously 90s it is. This is the startup chime. For comparison, the Interstellar News chime from Babylon 5. Sure beats these.

Tiger to Catalina: let’s port some code

Many parts of a modern software stack have been around for a long time. That has trade-offs, but in terms of user experience is a great thing: software can be incrementally improved, providing customers with familiarity and stability. No need to learn an entirely new thing, because your existing thing just keeps on working. It’s […]

So, what’s the plan? Part 2: what will the plan be?

In Part One, I explored the time of transition from Mac OS 8 to Mac OS X (not a typo: Mac OS 9 came out during the transition period). From a software development perspective, this included the Carbon and Cocoa UI frameworks. I mooted the possibility that Apple’s plan was “erm, actually, Java” and that […]

So, what’s the plan? Part 1: what WAS the plan?

No CEO dominated a market without a plan, but no market was dominated by following the plan. — I made this quote up. Let’s say it was Rockefeller or someone. In Accidental Tech Podcast 385: Temporal Smear, John Siracusa muses on what “the plan” for Apple’s various GUI frameworks might be. In summary, and I […]

Anti-lock brakes

Chances are, if you bought a new car or even a new motorcycle within the last few years, you didn’t even get an option on ABS. It came as standard, and in your car was legally mandated. Anti-lock brakes work by measuring the rotational acceleration of the wheels, or comparing their rotational velocities. If one […]

Another non-year of Desktop Linux

Let’s look at other software on the desktop, to understand why there isn’t (as a broad, popular platform) Linux on the desktop, then how there could be. Over on De Programmatica Ipsum I discussed the difference between the platform business model, and the technology platform. In the platform model, the business acts as a matchmaking […]

SICPers podcast episode 10

This episode is all about build systems! Mostly about the problems associated with the venerable ./configure; make; make install process. This expands on a section I wrote in APPropriate Behaviour. The history of UNIX make Why Johnny Can’t Build [portable scientific software] Recursive Make Considered Harmful Non-recursive Make Considered Harmful A Generation Lost in the […]