Product teams: our products are not our products

Woah, too many products. Let me explain. No, it will take too long, let me summarise.

Sometimes, people running software organisations call their teams “product teams”, and organise them around particular “products”. I do not believe that this is a good idea. Because we typically aren’t making products, we’re solving problems.

The difference is that a product is “done”. If you have a “product team”, they probably have a “definition of done”, and then release software that has satisfied that definition. Even where that’s iterative and incremental, it leads to there being a “product”. The thing that’s live represents as much of the product as has been done.

The implications of there being a “product” that is partially done include optimising for getting more “done”. Particularly, we will prioritise adding new stuff (getting more “done”) over fixing old stuff (shuffling the deckchairs). We will target productish metrics, like number of daily actives and time spent.

Let me propose an alternative: we are not making products, we are solving problems. And, as much out of honesty as job preservation, let me assure you that the problems are very difficult to solve. They are problems in cybernetics, in other words in communication and control in a complex system. The system is composed of three identifiable, interacting subsystems:

  1. The people who had the problem;
  2. The people who are trying to solve the problem;
  3. The software created to present the current understanding of the solution.

In this formulation, we don’t want “amount of product” to be a goal, we want “sufficiency of solution” to be a goal. We accept that the software does not represent the part of the “product” that has been “done”. The software represents our best effort to date at modelling our understanding of the solution as we comprehend it to date.

We therefore accept that adding more stuff (extending the solution) is one approach we could consider, along with fixing old stuff (reflecting new understanding in our work). We accept that introducing the software can itself change the problem, and that more people using it isn’t necessarily a goal: maybe we’ve helped people to understand that they didn’t actually need that problem solved all along.

Now our goals can be more interesting than bushels of software shovelled onto the runtime furnace: they can be about sufficiency of the solution, empowerment of the people who had the problem, and improvements to their quality of life.

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