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There is no browser, only Zuul

My short-lived first plan for a career was in Physics. That’s what my first degree was in, but I graduated with the career goal “do something that isn’t a D.Phil. in Physics” in mind. I’d got on quite well with computers as a hobbyist, and the computing and electronics practicals in my course labs. A job as systems administrator for those very systems (a hotchpotch of NeXTSTEP, Solaris, OpenBSD, and Mac OS X) came up at the time that I graduated so I applied, got it, and became a computerer.

Along the way, I met people who thought that some people should not be computerers because their backgrounds were not exactly identical. The Google manager who could not believe that as an applicant for the lowest-grade QA role, I had not encountered the travelling salesman problem. The software engineer at Facebook who was incensed that someone applying to build a web application in PHP and Javascript did not know that there are eight bits in a byte (never mind that there aren’t, necessarily, eight bits in a byte). And now the random on Twitter who insists that people who don’t fully know browsers aren’t allowed to write web applications.

It’s easy to forget two things: the first is that at some point in the past, you didn’t know what you know now, but you learnt it because you were allowed to participate and were taught. Even if you think you were a self-learner, you had access to playground materials, books, tutorials, online documentation…and someone made those for you and allowed you to use them.

The second is what it was like not to know those things. I remember not understanding how OOP was anything more than putting dots in the name of your function, but now I understand it differently, and don’t know what the thing was that changed.

The second of these things shows how easy it is to be the gatekeeper. If you don’t remember what not understanding something was like, then maybe it came naturally, and if it isn’t coming naturally to someone else well maybe they just don’t get it. But the first shows that you didn’t get it, and yet here you are.

When faced with a gatekeeper, I usually react flippantly. Because of my Physics background, I explain, I know how quantum physics works, and how that enables semiconductors, and how to build a semiconductor transistor, then a NAND gate, then a processor, and basically what I’m saying is I don’t see how anyone who doesn’t know that stuff can claim to know computers at all.

But what I say to everyone else is “this stuff is really interesting, let me show it to you“.

Be the keymaster, not the gatekeeper.

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