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Your build needs to be better

I’ve said it before, build systems are a huge annoyance. If your build is anything other than seemingly instantaneous, it’s costing you severe money.

Your developers are probably off reading HN, or writing blog posts about how slow builds cost them, while the build is going. When they finish doing that, which may be some time after the build completes, they’ll have forgotten some of what they were doing and need to spend some time getting back up to speed.

Your developers are probably suspicious of any build failure, thinking that “the build is flaky” rather than “I made a mistake”. They’ll press the button again and go back to HN. When the same error occurs twice, they might look into it.

Your developers probably know that the build is slow, but not which bit of the build is slow. And they don’t have time to investigate that, where it takes so long to get any work done anyway. So everyone will agree that “there is a problem”, but nothing will get done. Or maybe cargo-cult things will get done, things that speed up “builds” but are not the problem with your build.

The Joel test asks whether you can make a build in one test. Insufficient. If you notice when you’re making a build, you’re slowing your developers down.

…which is not always the worst thing, of course. Sometimes a lengthy translation step from some source language to some optimised form of a machine language program yields better results for your customers, because they get to use a faster program and don’t need to care about the time taken to prepare that program. But let’s be clear: that’s part of the release, and your developers don’t always need to be working from the released product (in fact, they’re usually not). Releases should be asynchronous, and the latency between having something ready to be released and having released it can be fairly high, compared with the latency between having created some source and being able to investigate its utility.

Nonetheless, that should all go off in the background. So really, builds and releases should both be non-events to the developers.

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