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When all you have is a NailFactory…

…every problem looks like it can be solved by configuring a different nail.

We have an obsession with tools in the software industry. We’ve built tools for building software, tools for testing software, tools for recording how the software is broken, tools for recording when we fixed software. Tools for migrating data from the no-longer-cool tools into the cool tools. Tools for measuring how much other tools have been used.

Let’s call this Tool-Driven Development, and let’s give Tool-Driven Development the following manifesto (a real manifesto that outlines intended behaviour, not a green paper):

Given an observed lack of consideration toward attribute x, we Tool-Driven Developers commit to supplying a tool that automates the application of attribute x.

So, if your developers aren’t thinking about testing, we’ll make a tool to make the tests they don’t write run quicker! If your developers aren’t doing performance analysis, we’ve got all sorts of tools for getting the very reports they don’t know that they need!

This fascination with creating tools is a natural consequence of assuming that everyone[*] is like me. I’ve found this problem that I need to solve, surely everyone needs to solve this problem so I’ll write a tool. Then I can tell people how to use this tool and the problem will be solved for everyone!

[*]Obviously not everyone, just everyone who gets it. Those clueless [dinosaurs clinging to the old tools|hipsters jumping on the new bandwagons] don’t get it, and I’m not talking about them.

No. Well, not yet. We’ve skipped two important steps out of a three-step enlightenment scheme:

  1. Awareness. Tell me what the unknown that I don’t know is.
  2. Education. Tell me why this thing that I now know about is a big deal, what I’m missing out on, what the drawbacks are, and why solving it would be beneficial.
  3. Training. Now that I know this thing exists, and that I should do something about it, and what that something is, now is the time to show me the tools and how I can use them to solve my new problem.

One of the talks at QCon London was by Damian Conway on dead languages. It covered these three features almost in reverse, to make the point that the tools we use constrain our mental models of the problems we’re trying to solve. Training: here’s a language, this is how it works, this is a code problem solved in that language. Education: the language has these features which lets us write our code in this way with these limitations. Awareness: there are ways to write code, and hence to solve problems in software, that aren’t the way you’re currently doing it.

A lot of what I’ve worked on has covered awareness without going further. The App Makers’ Privacy Pledge raises awareness that privacy in mobile apps is a problem, without discussing the details of the problem or the mechanics of a solution. APPropriate Behaviour contains arguments expressing that programmers should be aware of the social scope in which their programming activities sit.

While I appreciate and even accept the charge of intellectual foreplay, I think a problem looking for a solution is more useful than a solution looking for a problem. Still, with some of us doing the awareness thing and others doing the training thing, a scheme by which we can empower ourselves and future developers is clear: let’s team up and meet in the middle.