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{ Category Archives } economics

No, you can’t ignore politics

I wrote, a couple of years ago, about the fact that you can’t ignore ethics in software engineering. Your software is built for a reason, it’s used for a reason, you need to be aware of those reasons and whether you’re supporting or enabling them. That goes for politics too. That hacker news declared this […]

On the rhetorical cost of ownership

I’ve recently been talking about software engineering economics, in a very loose way, but so have other people. And now I understand that it’s annoying when people talk about it, and have decided to continue anyway. I’ve decided to continue because what I see is either inaccurate comparisons being made, or valid comparisons that have […]

On the business case for (or against) software

In the vexing problems, I dismissed the hard problems of computer science as being incidental to another problem: we can’t say what the value of our work is. That post contained plenty of questions, precisely because the subject is so unknown. There are plenty of ways in which the “value” of something can be discussed, […]

The Vexing Problems in Programming

I admit it, I’ve been on the internet for quite a while (I could tell you that my ICQ number is 95941970, but I haven’t logged in for years) and my habits haven’t changed. I still regularly get technology news from slashdot, and today was no exception. An interesting article was Here Be Dragons: The […]

The other pink dollar

How did (a very broad and collective) we go from selling NeXT at $440M to selling Tumblr at $1.1B, in under two decades? Why was Sun Microsystems, one of the most technologically advanced companies in the valley, only worth two Nests? I don’t think we’re technologists (much) any more. We’ve moved from building value by […]

Intellectual property and software: the nuclear option

There are many problems that arise from thinking about the ownership of software and its design. Organisations like the Free Software Foundation and Open Source Initiative take advantage of the protections of copyright of source code – presumed to be a creative work analogous to a written poem or a painting on canvas – to […]

The Wealth of Applications

Adam Smith’s Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations opens by discussing the division of labour. How people are able to get more done when they each pick a small part of the work to be done and focus on that, trading their results with others to gain access to the […]

The lighter side of open source

In a recent post I talked about the apolitical, amoral nature of open source software and how it puts the interests of a small programming class before the interests of the broad collection of people who interact with programmers’ output. The open source movement has been of great benefit to the software industry, and this […]

Code longevity

I recently wrote about the impending centenary of applied computing; a time when we could reflect on the first hundred years to make it easier for people to progress beyond our position into the second hundred years. This necessitates looking at the things we’ve tried, the things that succeeded and the things that failed. It […]