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{ Category Archives } documentation

Today’s surprisingly short workflow-improving win

When I have a TODO comment (or a #error in code, which is how I frequently do TODOs), I switched to writing the commit message I want to be able to use when I’ve fixed the TODO. Then I write the thing that’s missing, kill the TODO and yank it into the commit command.

On what makes a “good” comment

I have previously discussed the readability of code: The author must decide who will read the code, and how to convey the important information to those readers. The reader must analyse the code in terms of how it satisfies this goal of conveyance, not whether they enjoyed the indentation strategy or dislike dots on principle. […]

Meta-writing

Barely 4,000 years ago, documents were written on heavy, clay tablets. The Epic of Gilgamesh, one of the earliest known works of fiction, was written on 11 such tablets with a 12th added later. There was only one thing you could do with these tablets: read. Fast forward to the 21-st century and things are […]

Specifications for interchanging objects

One of the interesting aspects of Smalltalk and similar languages including Objective-C and Ruby is that while the object model exposes a hierarchy of classes, consumers of objects in these environments are free to ignore the position of the object in that hierarchy. The hierarchy can be thought of as a convenience: on the one […]

The Liskov Citation Principle

In her keynote speech at QCon London 2013 on The Power of Abstraction, Barbara Liskov referred to several papers contemporary with her work on abstract data types. I’ve collected these references and found links to free copies of the articles where available. Dijkstra 1968 Go To statement considered harmful Wirth 1971 Program development by stepwise […]

Does that thing you like doing actually work?

Genuine question. I’ve written before about Test-Driven Development, and I’m sure some of you practice it: can you show evidence that it’s better than (or, for that matter, evidence that it’s worse than) some other practice? Statistically significant evidence? How about security? Can you be confident that there’s a benefit to spending any money or […]

I made a web!

That is, I made a C program using the literate programming tool, CWEB. The product it outputs is, almost by definition, self-documenting, so find out about the algorithm and how I built it by reading the PDF. This post is about the process. Unsurprisingly I found it much more mentally taxing to understand a prose […]

Illuminative-C

In addition to being a mildly accomplished software engineer, I’ve done some studying and armchair research in the field of ancient languages and palaeography. What happens if we smoosh those fields together? In a very slight way, art historian and fellow Oxenafordisc Dr. Janina Ramirez did that in her series on Illuminations: the Private Lives […]

On explaining stuff to people

An article that recently made the rounds, though it was written back in September, is called Apple’s Idioten Vektor. It’s a discussion of how the CCCrypt() function in Apple’s CommonCrypto library, when used in its default cipher block chaining mode, treats the IV (Initialization Vector) parameter as optional. If you don’t supply an IV, it […]

On comment docs

Something I’m looking at right now is generation of (in my case, HTML) API documentation from some simple markup format. The usual way to do this is by writing documentation markup inline in the source code, using specially formatted comments in header files. The point Some people argue that well-written source code should be its […]