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On having things to say

I enjoyed Jaimee’s discussion of preparing her public talks, and realised that my approach has moved in a different way. I’ve probably talked about this before but I’ve also changed how I go about it. This is my technique, particularly where it diverges from Jaimee’s; synthesis can come later (and will undoubtedly help me!). I […]

On running out of words

John Gruber’s subscription to Wiktionary expired: At just 20 percent of unit sales, Apple isn’t even close to a monopoly. At 92 percent profit share, they have a market dominance that rivals any actual monopoly the tech industry has ever seen. We don’t even have a term for this situation, it’s so unusual. We do […]

Imperative Programming in Swift

A cliche in programming is that certain ways of writing programs make it possible to “reason about” code. So it should be possible to form an argument that proceeds from some axioms to a conclusion about the code we’re looking at via some logical (or otherwise defensible) steps. Looking at the declaration of this function, […]

A brief interlude

Honestly, this next post will take a while.

Functional Programming in Object-Oriented Programming in Functional Programming in Swift

The objects that I’ve been building up over the last few posts have arbitrarily broad behaviours. They can respond to any selector drawn from the set of all possible strings. As with all art, beauty is produced by imposing constraints. An important class (pardon the pun) of objects only has a meaningful response to one […]

Classes in objects in object-oriented programming in functional programming in Swift

So far, Objective-Swift objects have used prototypical inheritance, in which they supply some methods but also know about another object to which they can forward messages they don’t understand themselves. This pattern is used in languages like Self, JavaScript and Io but is not common to other languages that also call themselves object-oriented programming languages. […]

Mutable objects in immutable objects in object-oriented programming in functional programming in Swift

I didn’t realise this at the time, the previous entry wasn’t the last Objective-Swift post. The inheritance mechanism in ObjS is prototypical, meaning that an object inherits from a single other object rather than getting its behaviour from a class. This is the same system that Self and languages that, um, inherit its approach use. […]

Finishing the ObjS story

This gist shows the result of doing the self-threading talked about at the end of the last post. Each method implementation takes an object pointer and a selector name, just like in the real world. That’s enough Objective-Swift for me. Yes, more could be done (mostly defining a preprocessor to make the syntax more regular) […]

Further Advances in Objective-Swift

Previously on SICPers, I defined objects as functions that return methods and built dynamic method dispatch in this object system. It’s time to tie up some loose ends. Proper selectors In languages like Smalltalk and Objective-C, an object’s range isn’t a small list of selectors like count and at:. It’s the whole of the String […]

Dynamic Method Dispatch in Object-Oriented Programming in Functional Programming in Swift

In the previous episode, I said that objects are functions that map their ivars onto methods. However, the objects that I demonstrated in the post were tables, structures of functions that closed over the ivars, like this: struct List<T> { let count: () -> Int let at: (Int) -> T? } Functions and tables are […]