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Technical debt and jury service

We have the idea that in addition to the product development backlogs for our teams, there’s an engineering backlog where technical debt paydown, process/tooling improvements, and other sitewide engineering concerns get recorded. Working on them is done in time that is, by definition, taken away from the product backlogs (because of Sustainable Pace).

A colleague recently described the time spent on the engineering backlog as a “tax”, which is an interesting analogy. A pejorative interpretation is that, like a tax, centralised engineering work is a cost imposed that takes away from realising more value on my direct projects.

A positive spin is that taxes go toward funding the commons: no one of us can afford to build a road between our house and the office, but having roads connecting all the houses to all the offices has strategic benefit to society as a whole (higher productivity, lower unemployment, more opportunities) so if we all pay in a fraction of the cost of a road we can all have a road. Similarly, one product team might grind to a halt if they spend all of their time on the new CD pipeline infrastructure, but all teams will benefit if they all chip in a bit.

This version of the analogy implies that there might be, like the treasury, a central agency deciding how to spend the common wealth. Somebody needs to decide how much tax everyone should pay, what to do with dissenters (is it OK if your product team focuses on its sprint for a fortnight and doesn’t do any of the engineering backlog?), whether to accept overpayments, and what those tax dollars should go on.

Only it’s not tax dollars, it’s tax hours. In this sense, a better analogy is conscription (I originally thought of the Anglo-Saxon fyrd, maybe jury service or non-military national service is a less aggressive way to consider this). Taxation means that I give all of my work time to Wealth Wizards but give a chunk of my money to the government. Conscription means that I don’t get to give all of my time to my employer: some of it has to go to the commons. Maybe Jonathan and Rebecca can’t give any time to their product teams this week because they’ve been “called up” to the engineering backlog effort.

That seems like a useful analogy for these tasks. I can think about what resources are available for products or “the commons”, because I can think about whether someone is working on “the day job” or has been conscripted. Maybe it doesn’t make sense for everybody to have equal likelihood of being “called up”, in the same way that it’s easier for students to get out of jury service than for full-time employees.

{ 1 } Comments

  1. William Beckler | July 19, 2017 at 10:28 pm | Permalink

    At the beginning of the article I thought you were headed in a different direction: technical debt repayment should not be considered as a distinct tax, but should be combined into upcoming product development stories. Sort of like a sales tax on all future development that you pay as you go along by cleaning up things as you see them broken. I think that’s the only way stuff ever gets better. Only developers can decide where it’s worth it for them to clean as they go so as to maximize their own overall velocity.

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