Skip to content

{ Monthly Archives } April 2015

A kata above

The code kata is a method software craftspeople use to practice their craft. The idea is that you take a problem you understand, like FizzBuzz or Conway’s Life, and build an application that implements it. Then build another one. And another. Pretty soon, you should be quite good at building a thing with well-understood requirements. […]

The Design of the Bazaar

In The Design of Design, Fred Brooks makes an interesting point about ESR’s description of the Bazaar model of Linux (and, by extension, “Open Source”) development. Linux was actually designed in a cathedral. The design was supplied by Unix, where Linux was to be a work-alike replacement for a particular component. There was even a […]

An acceptable tool

An acceptable tool It’s easy to forget that adequacy is, well, adequate. It’s easy to go all-in on making some code structure perfect, when good enough would be good enough.

Beware the IDEs

I recently had the opportunity to talk with a couple of software project managers from IBM. That company is of a kind that I have never worked at, and many of the companies I have worked at are of kinds that these IBMers have not worked at. There was thus plenty of opportunity for us […]

Hiding behind messages

A problem I think about every so often is how to combine the software design practice of hiding implementations behind interfaces with the engineering practice of parallel execution. What are the trade-offs between making parallelism explicit and information hiding? Where are some lines that can be drawn? Why do we need abstractions for this stuff, […]