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Intra-curricular activities

I’m apparently fascinated by the idea of defining curricula for learning programming. I’ve written about how we need to be careful what we try to pay forward from the way we learned in the past, and I’ve talked about how we do need to pay it forward so that the second hundred years see faster progress than the first hundred years.

I’m a fan (with reservations, as seen below) of the book series as a form of curriculum. Take something like Kent Beck’s signature series, which covers a decent subset of both technical and social approaches in software development in breadth and in depth. You could probably imagine developers who would benefit from reading some or all of the books in the series. In fact, you may be one.

Coping with people approaching the curriculum from different skill levels and areas of experience is hard. Not just for the book series, it’s hard in general. Universities take the simplifying approach of assuming that everybody wants to learn the same stuff, and teaching that stuff. And to some extent that’s easy for them, because the backgrounds of prospective students is relatively uniform. Even so, my University course organised incoming students into two groups; those who had studied complex numbers at A-level and those who had not. The difference was simply that the group who had not were given a couple of lectures on complex numbers, then it was assumed that they also knew the topic from the fourth week.

Now consider selling a programming book to the public. Part of the proposal process with all of the publishers I’ve worked with has been describing the target audience. Is this a book for people who have never programmed before? For people who have programmed a little, but never used this particular tool or technique? People who have programmed a lot but never used this tool? Is this thing similar to what they have used before, or very different? For people who are somewhat familiar with the tool? For experts (and how is that defined)? Is it for readers comfortable with maths? For readers with no maths background?

Every “no” in answer to one of those questions is an opportunity to improve the experience for a subset of the potential audience by tailoring it to that subset. It’s also an opportunity to exclude a subset of the audience by making the content less relevant to them.

[I’ll digress here to explain how I worked that out for my books: whether it’s selfishness or a failure of empathy, I wrote books that I wanted to read but that didn’t exist. Therefore the expected experience is something similar to mine, back when I filled in the proposal form.]

Clearly no single publication will cover the whole phase space of potential readers and be any good. The interesting question is how much it’s worth covering with multiple publications; whether the idea of series-as-curriculum pulls in the general direction as much as scope-limiting each book pulls in the specific. Should the curriculum take readers on a straight line from novice to master? Should it “fan in” from multiple introductions? Should it “fan out” in multiple directions of interest and enquiry? Would a non-linear curriculum be inclusive or offputtingly confusing? Should the questions really be answered by substituting the different question “how many people would buy that”?