Skip to content

On phone support scams and fake AV

A couple of weeks ago, I posted on Twitter about a new scam:

Heard about someone who was phoned by a man “from Windows” who engineered his way into remote access to the mark’s computer.

Fast forward to now, the same story has finally been picked up by the security vendors and the mainstream media. This means it’s probably time to go into more depth.

I heard a first-hand account of the scam. The victim is the kind of person who shouldn’t be expected to understand IT security – a long distance lorry driver who uses his computer for browsing, e-mail, and that sort of thing. As he tells it, the person called, saying they were from Windows and that they had discovered his computer was infected. He was given instructions to give the caller remote access to help clean up the computer.

With remote access, the caller was able to describe some of the problems the victim was having with his computer, while taking control to “fix them”. The caller eventually discovered that the victim’s anti-virus was out of date, and that if he gave the caller his payment information he could get new software for £109. This is when the victim hung up; however his computer has not booted properly since then.

I think my audience here is probably tech-savvy enough not to need warning about scams like this, and to understand that the real damage was done even before any discussion of payments was made (hint: browser form-auto-fill data). It’s not the scam itself I want to focus on, but our reaction.

Some people I have told this story to in real life (it does happen) have rolled their eyes, and said something along the lines of “well of course the users are the weakest link” in a knowing way. If that’s true, why rely on the users to make all the security decisions? Why leave it to them to decide what’s legitimate and what’s scammy, as was the case here? Why is the solution to any problem to shovel another bucketload of computer knowledge on them and hope that it sticks, as Sophos and the BBC have tried in the articles above?

No. This is not a solution to anything. No matter how loudly you shout about how that isn’t how Microsoft does business, someone who says he is from Microsoft will phone your users up and tell them that it is.

This is the same problem facing anti-virus vendors trying to convince us not to get fooled by FakeAV scams. Vendor A tells us to buy their product instead of Vendor B’s, because it’s better. So, is Vendor A the FakeAV pedlar, or B? Or is it both? Or neither? You can’t tell.

It may seem that this is a problem that cannot be solved in technology, that it relies on hard-wired behaviour of us bald apes. I don’t think that’s so. I think that it would be possible to change the way we, legitimate software vendors, interact with our users, and the way they interact with our software, such that an offline scam like this would never come to pass. A full discussion would fill a whole whitepaper that I haven’t written yet. However, to take the most extreme point from it, the one I know you’re going to loathe, what if our home computers were managed remotely by the vendors? Do most users really need complete BIOS and kernel level access to their kit? Really?

Look for the whitepaper sometime in the new year.

{ 1 } Comments

  1. Josiah | November 17, 2010 at 7:41 pm | Permalink

    Woah! “what if our home computers were managed remotely by the vendors?”

    this does not sit well with me.

{ 1 } Trackback

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Graham Lee, Amanda. Amanda said: RT @iamleeg: On phone support scams and fake AV: http://tinyurl.com/389mbkk […]