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On Trashing

Back in the 1980s and 1990s, people who wanted to clandestinely gain information about a company or organisation would go trashing.[*] That just meant diving in the bins to find information about the company structure – who worked there, who reported to whom, what orders or projects were currently in progress etc.

You’d think that these days trashing had been thwarted by the invention of the shredder, but no. While many companies do indeed destroy or shred confidential information, this is not universal. Those venues where shredding is common leave it up to their staff to decide what goes in the bin and what goes in the shredder; these staff do not always get it correct (they’re likely to think about whether a document is secret to them rather than the impact on the company). Nor do they always want to think about which bin to put a worthless sheet of paper in.

Even better: in those places that do shred secret papers, they helpfully collect all of the secrets in big bins marked “To Shred” to help the trashers :). They then collect all of these bins into a big hopper, and leave that around (sometimes outside the building, in a covered or open yard) for the destruction company to come and pick up.

So if an attacker can get entry to the building, he just roots around in the “To Shred” bins. Someone asks, he tells them he put a printout there in the morning but now think he needs it again. Even if he can’t get in, he just dives in the hopper outside and get access to all those juicy secrets (with none of the banana peelings and teabags associated with the non-secret bin).

But for those attackers who don’t like getting their hands dirty, they can gain some of the same information using technological means. LinkedIn will helpfully provide a list of employees – including their positions, so the public can find out something of the reporting structure. Some will be looking for recruitment opportunities – these are great people to phone for more information! So are ex-employees, something LinkedIn will also help you out with.

But the fun doesn’t stop there. Once our attacker has the names, he now goes over to Twitter and Facebook. There he can find people griping about work…or describing what the organisation is up to, to put it another way.

All of the above information about 21st-century trashing comes from real experience with an office I was invited into in the last 12 months. Of course, I will not name the organisation in charge of that office (or their data destruction company). The conclusion is that trashing is alive and well, and that those who participate need no longer root around in, well, in the trash. How does your organisation deal with the problem?

[*] for me, it was mainly the 1990s. I was the perfect size in the 1980s for trashing, but still finding my way around a Dragon 32.