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Configuring CruiseControl.rb in under an hour

One of the changes I decided to make straight after NSConf MINI yesterday was to enable continuous integration for my projects. I had used CI before based on BuildBot, but that had left me less than impressed:

  • It was really hard to set up
  • Its dependency system was less than optimal, leading it to do things like running the integration tests even after the build had failed
  • It had really bad memory consumption. The official line was that it didn’t leak, but used a massive working set. Now I don’t have a dedicated system for CI so can’t really spare all my RAM 🙂

In his talk yesterday, Gordon Murrison mentioned that Open Planet Software use CruiseControl.rb, and in conversation he assured me that it wasn’t as bad as all that. I decided to set it up today, and it took me pretty much an hour to go from downloading the source to having a working continuous integration setup. If I had known the stuff below, it could’ve been quicker.

The downloads page for CC.rb says that you need an older version of Ruby than Snow Leopard ships with, but I found that it actually works with the stock Ruby, so no problem there.

Before going any further, I decided to create a separate user account for automated builds. This is to provide some validation of the source code – so we know that the product actually can be built from the artefacts in SCM, and doesn’t depend on some magic configuration that happens to be part of my developer box. In fact, it turns out that for me there was some magic configuration in place – the Rehearsals build depends on the BGHUDAppKit IBPlugin, which of course wasn’t installed for my new cruisecontrol user.

So with the build environment set up, I can point CC.rb at my project. That’s done with this command line:

./cruise add Rehearsals --source-control svn --repository http://svn.thaesofereode.info/rehearsals/branches/branch-to-watch

Note that you have to specify the path all the way to the actual branch you want it to build (or trunk), not the top level of the repository. Now you need to tell it how to actually build the project. So edit ~/.cruise/projects/Rehearsals/cruise_config.rb and add a line like this:

project.build_command = 'xcodebuild -configuration Debug -target Test\ Cases build'

That tells Xcode to build the “Test Cases” target in Debug configuration, which in my case is what I need to get my OCUnit tests to run. While you’re in that file, set the project’s email settings, and create config/site_config.rb in the CC.rb distribution folder to set up the mail server (Gmail in my case). Now it should just be a case of running:

./cruise start

and watching my build succeed. But it wasn’t :(. My unit test target is injected into the app, which means that in order for the tests to even launch my cruisecontrol user needed a window server connection, so I used fast-user switching to log it in behind my real user. OK, so now my unit tests are automatically run whenever I check in some source on that branch, and I can see the status at http://localhost:3333/.

That’s as far as I’ve got for now. Of course I’d like to have the cruisecontrol user automatically log in and run CC.rb whenever the system starts up, I’ll create a launch agent to do that. But I also have a gcov-instrumented build configuration, and it would be instructive for CC.rb to automatically report on code coverage when the tests are run (though that report shouldn’t affect the result of the build). But I think I’ve done enough for one day, it’s time to go back to writing tests :).

Update: Thanks Simon Whitaker for finding a guide to run CC.rb under Apache using Passenger. I’m not sure how that would work in my case where I need a WindowServer connection, but I’m sure that there will be projects where this is a better way to get the thing running automatically.

{ 3 } Comments

  1. Simon Whitaker | June 12, 2010 at 6:58 pm | Permalink

    I did the same when I got home! If you’re on a Mac take a look at CCMenu for red-light-green-light-in-your-menubar goodness:

    http://ccmenu.sourceforge.net/

    Would also be nice to get cruise control running under Apache (using Passenger?) rather than as a launch agent I reckon. Couple of good tutorials on the net about getting that working.

  2. Gordon Murrison | June 12, 2010 at 8:09 pm | Permalink

    Nice post. Here is the link to our build monitoring system with the lights.

    http://blog.openplanetsoftware.com/2009/02/how-cool-sad-is-this.html

  3. Graham | September 16, 2010 at 9:06 pm | Permalink

    On reflection (and in writing a presentation on unit testing), I’ve decided that dependent test bundles (i.e. those injected into a real app) are bad, m’kay? Not sure whether that’s worth a whole new post, but it obviates the problems regarding WindowServers above (and others, particularly an interaction between the OCMock and main event loops).