Skip to content

So it’s not just the Department of Homeland Security, then

What is it about government security agencies and, well, security? The UK Intelligence and Security Committee has just published its Annual Report 2008-2009 (pdf, because if there’s one application we all trust, it’s Adobe Reader), detailing financial and policy issues relating to the British security services during that year.

Sounds “riveting”, yes? Well the content is under Crown copyright[*], so I can excerpt some useful tidbits. According to the director of GCHQ:

The greatest threat [to government IT networks] is from state actors and there is an increasing vulnerability, as the critical national infrastructure and other networks become more interdependent.

The report goes on to note:

State-sponsored electronic attack is increasingly being used by nations to gather intelligence, particularly when more traditional espionage methods cannot be used. It is assessed that the greatest threat of such attacks against the UK comes from China and Russia.

and yet:

The National Audit Office management letter, reporting on GCHQ’s 2007/08 accounts, criticised the results of GCHQ’s 2008 laptop computer audit. This showed that 35 laptops were unaccounted for, including three that were certified to hold Top Secret information; the rest were unclassified. We pressed GCHQ about its procedures for controlling and tracking such equipment. It appears that the process for logging the allocation and subsequent location of laptops has been haphazard. We were told:
Historically, we just checked them in and checked them out and updated the records when they went through our… laptop control process.

So our government’s IT infrastructure is under attack from two of the most resourceful countries in the world, and our security service is giving out Top Secret information for free? It sounds like all the foreign intelligence services need to do is employ their own staff to empty the bins in Cheltenham. In fairness, GCHQ have been mandated to implement better asset-tracking mechanisms; if they do so then the count of missing laptops will be reduced to only reflect thefts/misplaced systems. At the moment it includes laptops that were correctly disposed of, in a way that did not get recorded at GCHQ.

[*] Though significantly redacted. We can’t actually tell what the budget of the intelligence services is, nor what they’re up to. How the budget is considered sensitive information, I’m not sure.